Tuesday, February 7, 2017

CPT 95886, 95911, 95913, 95910, 95885 - Nerve Conduction study.

Procedure code and Description

Group 1 Codes:

51785 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY STUDIES (EMG) OF ANAL OR URETHRAL SPHINCTER, ANY TECHNIQUE

92265 NEEDLE OCULOELECTROMYOGRAPHY, 1 OR MORE EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLES, 1 OR BOTH EYES, WITH INTERPRETATION AND REPORT

95860 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; 1 EXTREMITY WITH OR WITHOUT RELATED PARASPINAL AREAS

95861 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; 2 EXTREMITIES WITH OR WITHOUT RELATED PARASPINAL AREAS

95863 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; 3 EXTREMITIES WITH OR WITHOUT RELATED PARASPINAL AREAS

95864 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; 4 EXTREMITIES WITH OR WITHOUT RELATED PARASPINAL AREAS

95865 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; LARYNX

95866 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; HEMIDIAPHRAGM

95867 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; CRANIAL NERVE SUPPLIED MUSCLE(S), UNILATERAL

95868 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; CRANIAL NERVE SUPPLIED MUSCLES, BILATERAL

95869 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; THORACIC PARASPINAL MUSCLES (EXCLUDING T1 OR T12)

95870 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY; LIMITED STUDY OF MUSCLES IN 1 EXTREMITY OR NON-LIMB (AXIAL) MUSCLES (UNILATERAL OR BILATERAL), OTHER THAN THORACIC PARASPINAL, CRANIAL NERVE SUPPLIED MUSCLES, OR SPHINCTERS

95872 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY USING SINGLE FIBER ELECTRODE, WITH QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF JITTER, BLOCKING AND/OR FIBER DENSITY, ANY/ALL SITES OF EACH MUSCLE STUDIED

95873 ELECTRICAL STIMULATION FOR GUIDANCE IN CONJUNCTION WITH CHEMODENERVATION (LIST SEPARATELY IN ADDITION TO CODE FOR PRIMARY PROCEDURE)

95874 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY FOR GUIDANCE IN CONJUNCTION WITH CHEMODENERVATION (LIST SEPARATELY IN ADDITION TO CODE FOR PRIMARY PROCEDURE)

95885 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY, EACH EXTREMITY, WITH RELATED PARASPINAL AREAS, WHEN PERFORMED, DONE WITH NERVE CONDUCTION, AMPLITUDE AND LATENCY/VELOCITY STUDY; LIMITED (LIST SEPARATELY IN ADDITION TO CODE FOR PRIMARY PROCEDURE)

95886 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY, EACH EXTREMITY, WITH RELATED PARASPINAL AREAS, WHEN PERFORMED, DONE WITH NERVE CONDUCTION, AMPLITUDE AND LATENCY/VELOCITY STUDY; COMPLETE, FIVE OR MORE MUSCLES STUDIED, INNERVATED BY THREE OR MORE NERVES OR FOUR OR MORE SPINAL LEVELS (LIST SEPARATELY IN ADDITION TO CODE FOR PRIMARY PROCEDURE)

95887 NEEDLE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY, NON-EXTREMITY (CRANIAL NERVE SUPPLIED OR AXIAL) MUSCLE(S) DONE WITH NERVE CONDUCTION, AMPLITUDE AND LATENCY/VELOCITY STUDY (LIST SEPARATELY IN ADDITION TO CODE FOR PRIMARY PROCEDURE)

95905 MOTOR AND/OR SENSORY NERVE CONDUCTION, USING PRECONFIGURED ELECTRODE ARRAY(S), AMPLITUDE AND LATENCY/VELOCITY STUDY, EACH LIMB, INCLUDES F-WAVE STUDY WHEN PERFORMED, WITH INTERPRETATION AND REPORT

95907 NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES; 1-2 STUDIES

95908 NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES; 3-4 STUDIES

95909 NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES; 5-6 STUDIES

95910 NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES; 7-8 STUDIES

95911 NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES; 9-10 STUDIES

95912 NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES; 11-12 STUDIES

95913 NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES; 13 OR MORE STUDIES

95933 ORBICULARIS OCULI (BLINK) REFLEX, BY ELECTRODIAGNOSTIC TESTING

95937 NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION TESTING (REPETITIVE STIMULATION, PAIRED STIMULI), EACH NERVE, ANY 1 METHOD

95999 UNLISTED NEUROLOGICAL OR NEUROMUSCULAR DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURE

G0255 CURRENT PERCEPTION THRESHOLD/SENSORY NERVE CONDUCTION TEST, (SNCT) PER LIMB, ANY NERVE



Coverage Indications, Limitations, and/or Medical Necessity

This contractor expects healthcare professionals who perform electrodiagnostic (ED) testing will be appropriately trained and/or credentialed, either by a formal residency/fellowship program, certification by a nationally recognized organization, or by an accredited post-graduate training course covering anatomy, neurophysiology and forms of electrodiagnostics (including both NCS and EMG) acceptable to this contractor, in order to provide the proper testing and assessment of the patient's condition, and appropriate safety measures. It would be highly unlikely that this training and/or credentialing is possessed by providers other than Neurologists, or Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation physicians.

The electrodiagnostic evaluation is an extension of the neurologic portion of the physical examination. Both require a detailed knowledge of a patient and his/her disease. Training in the performance of electrodiagnostic procedures in isolation of knowledge about clinical diagnostic and management aspects of neuromuscular diseases, may not be adequate for proper performance of an electrodiagnostic evaluation and correct interpretation of electrodiagnostic test results. Without awareness of the patterns of abnormality expected in different diseases and knowledge that the results of nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG) may be similar in different diseases, diagnosis solely by EMG-NCS findings may be both inadequate and ultimately be detrimental to the patient.

Guidelines about proper qualifications for qualified health care professionals performing electrodiagnostic evaluations have been developed and published by AANEM (American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine) and other medical organizations, including the AMA, the American Academy of Neurology, the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, American Neurological Association, the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) in Clinical Electrophysiology, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Both EMGs and NCSs are usually required for a clinical diagnosis of peripheral nervous system disorders. Performance of one type of testing does not eliminate the need for the other. The intensity and extent of testing with EMG and NCS are matters of clinical judgment developed after the initial pre-test evaluation, and later modified during the testing procedure.

Decisions to continue, modify or conclude a testing rely on knowledge of anatomy, physiology and neuromuscular diseases. Ongoing real-time assessment of data is required during the clinical diagnostic evaluation and especially during EMG examination.

Nerve conduction studies (NCS) are used to measure action potentials resulting from peripheral nerve stimulation which are recordable over the nerve or from an innervated muscle. With this technique, responses are measured between two sites of stimulation, or between a stimulus and a recording site.

Nerve conduction studies are of two general types: sensory and motor. Either surface or needle electrodes can be used to stimulate the nerve or record the response. Axonal damage or dysfunction generally results in loss of nerve or muscle potential response amplitude; whereas, demyelination leads to prolongation of conduction time and slowing of conduction velocity.

Obtaining and interpreting NCS results requires extensive interaction between the performing qualified health care professional and patient, and is most effective when both obtaining raw data and interpretation are performed concurrently on a real-time basis.

Results of the NCS reflect on the integrity and function of:
(I) the myelin sheath (Schwann cell derived insulation covering an axon), and
(II) the axon (an extension of neuronal cell body) of a nerve.

Interruption of axon and dysfunction of myelin will both affect NCS results.

It is often also valuable to test conduction status in proximal segments of peripheral nerves. This assessment can be accomplished by H-reflex, F-wave and blink reflex testing. These proximal segments include the first several centimeters of a compound nerve emerging from the spinal cord or brainstem. H-reflex, F-waves and Blink reflex testing accomplish this task better than distal NCS.

Electromyography (EMG) is the study and recording of intrinsic electrical properties of skeletal muscles. This is carried out with a needle electrode. Generally, the needles are of two types: monopolar or concentric. EMG is undertaken together with NCS. Unlike NCS, however, EMG testing relies on both auditory and visual feedback to the electromyographer. This testing is also invasive in that it requires needle electrode insertion and adjustment at multiple sites, and at times anatomically critical sites. As in NCS during EMG studies the electromyographer depends on ongoing real-time interpretation based knowledge of clinical diagnosis being evaluated to decide whether to continue, modify, or conclude a test. This process requires knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and neuromuscular diseases.

EMG results reflect not only on the integrity of the functioning connection between a nerve and its innervated muscle but also on the integrity of a muscle itself. The axon innervating a muscle is primarily responsible for the muscle’s volitional contraction, survival, and trophic functions. Thus, interruption of the axon will alter the EMG. A few prime examples of conditions in which EMG is potentially helpful are disc disease producing spinal nerve dysfunction, advanced nerve compression in peripheral lesions, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), polyneuropathy, etc. After an acute neurogenic lesion, EMG changes may not appear for several days to weeks in the innervated muscles. Primary muscle disease such as polymyositis will also alter a normal EMG pattern. Myotonic disorders may show a pattern of spontaneous repetitive discharges on needle exploration.

In summary, axonal and muscle involvement are most sensitively detected by EMGs, and myelin and axonal involvement are best detected by NCSs.

Physical Therapists Performing EMGs

Program Memorandum Transmittal B-01-28/Change Request 850 sets forth revised levels of physician supervision required for diagnostic tests payable under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Effective July 1, 2001, certain codes in the range of CPT 95860-95937 were assigned new supervision levels (21, 22, 6a, 66, 77 or 77a). This implementation date would make it possible for physical therapists to acquire the certification required to perform these services without supervision. A physical therapist who is presently certified by the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties can perform procedures assigned level of 21, 22, 66, 6a, 77, or 77a without supervision. These numeric levels assigned to the CPT codes are listed in the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Database (MFSDB). Physical therapists who do not possess the ABPTS (American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties) certification by July 1, 2001, may continue to furnish those tests that require the certification if they have been furnishing such diagnostic tests prior to May 1, 2001.
Payment will be based on the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule level of supervision designation.
Nerve conduction code 95905 does not have one of the above designations and is therefore not allowed by Physical Therapists.

Nerve conduction codes 95907-95913 had their Physician Supervision of Diagnostic Procedures Indicators adjusted to 7A effective 01/01/2013 (CR 8169). Therefore if authorized by state law Physical Therapists are allowed the technical portion and professional component of the test according to the description of 7A which is included in the Billing and Coding Guideline attached.

The technical component (TC) of the Neuromuscular junction testing code 95937 had its Physician Supervision of Diagnostic Procedures Indicator changed to “7A” This change is effective January 1, 2013.

Needle electromyographic (EMG) codes 95860-95872 and 95885-95887 have the designation of 6A for the technical portion of the test. Therefore if authorized by state law Physical Therapists are allowed the technical portion of the test according to the description of 6A which is included in the Billing and Coding Guideline attached.

A. Nerve Conduction Studies

The dichotomy into axonal and demyelinating neuropathies provides a practical means of correlating electrical abnormalities with major pathophysiologic changes in the nerve. Electrical studies can be of help in localization of an abnormality, and in distinguishing one variety of neuropathy from another: for example, diffuse vs. multifocal; axonal vs. demyelinating. Such distinction has diagnostic value. Specific classification of nerve injuries into neuropraxia and axonotmesis can be made on the basis of conduction studies and electromyography. Such classification has a bearing on prognosis and treatment.
Focal neuropathies or compressive lesions such as carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar neuropathies or root lesions, for localization.

Traumatic nerve lesions, for diagnosis and prognosis.

Diagnosis or confirmation of suspected generalized neuropathies, such as diabetic, uremic, metabolic or immune.

Repetitive nerve stimulation in diagnosis of neuromuscular junction disorders such as myasthenia gravis, myasthenic syndrome.

There may be other instances, not detailed here, where NCS may be of use. Not all possible or potential indications are addressed here.

The broad diagnostic scope of NCS is recognizable by the foregoing description. There may be instances where questions about an indication, or need for a study, will arise. The clinical history and examination, carried out before the study, must always describe and document clearly and comprehensibly the need for the planned test. A "rule-out" diagnosis is typically not acceptable. The Contractor is cognizant of the fact that patients are not always referred with a definite diagnosis in mind. Often, pain, paresthesia, or weakness in an extremity is the reason for an NCS or EMG. These common symptoms result not only from axonal and myelin dysfunction but also from systemic, non-neurological illnesses. EMG and NCS may help in making this distinction. Therefore, symptom-based diagnoses such as "pain in limb" weakness, disturbance in skin sensation or "paresthesia" are acceptable provided the clinical assessment unequivocally supports the need for a study. To cite but one example of many, an EMG or NCS is irrelevant as a first order diagnostic test for limb pain resulting from immediate antecedent trauma or acute bone injury.

Both EMGs and NCSs are required for a clinical diagnosis of peripheral nervous system disorders. EMG results reflect on the integrity of the functioning connection between a nerve and its innervated muscle and also on the integrity of a muscle itself. Performance of one does not eliminate the need for the other. The intensity and extent of testing with EMG and NCS are matters of clinical judgment developed after the initial pre-test evaluation, and later modified during the testing procedure.

Decisions to continue, modify or conclude a test also rely on a knowledge base of anatomy, physiology and neuromuscular diseases. There is a requirement for ongoing real-time clinical diagnostic evaluation, especially during EMG examination. Also, EMG examination is invasive. Needle placement in the exact muscle of interest is essential. It requires needle exploration near vital structures as the pleura, femoral neurovascular bundle, peritoneum, intraspinal spaces, carotid artery, orbit and brachial plexus. Risk of infection from AIDS, Hepatitis B-E, Creutzfeldt-Jakob encephalopathy, and hemorrhage from anticoagulation can be managed by proper techniques.

The electrodiagnostic evaluation is actually an extension of the neurologic portion of the physical examination. Both require a detailed knowledge of a patient and his/her disease. Training in the performance of electrodiagnostic procedures, in isolation without awareness and ability to diagnose and manage neuromuscular diseases, is not always adequate for electrodiagnostic consultation. Recognition and experience in the management of disparate diseases that produce common electrodiagnostic findings may be necessary. For example, EMG-NCS findings may overlap in the following pairs of disorders: inflammatory myopathies and ALS, ALS and multi-level radiculopathies, myotonia of channelopathies (periodic paralyses) and myotonic dystrophies, focal neuropathies as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and proximal plexopathies. Other instances where knowledge of disease behavior is crucial are Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy (CIDP) and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy. These entities display electrodiagnostic features that resemble generalized polyneuropathies. Neuromuscular transmission disorders require separation based on clinical presentation and electrical features. Treatment will depend on differentiating among them. Without awareness of the disease spectrum, diagnosis solely by EMG-NCS findings may be either wrong or detrimental to the patient.

The following definitions are from the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine Recommended Policy for Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

"The stimulation of nerves is similar across all NCSs; the characteristics of motor, sensory, and mixed NCSs are different and are discussed separately below. In each case, an appropriate nerve is stimulated and recording is made either from the appropriate nerves or from muscle supplied by the motor nerve.
Motor. Motor NCSs are performed by applying electrical stimulation at various points along the course of a motor nerve while recording the electrical response from an appropriate muscle. Response parameters include amplitude, latency, configuration, and motor conduction velocity.

Sensory. Sensory NCSs are performed by applying electrical stimulation near a nerve and recording the response from a distant site along the nerve. Response parameters include amplitude, latency, and configuration.

Mixed NCSs are performed by applying electrical stimulation near a nerve containing both motor and sensory fibers (a mixed nerve) and recording from a different location along that nerve that also contains both motor and sensory nerve fibers. Response parameters include amplitude, latency, configuration, and motor conduction velocity."

CPT code 95905 -Nerve conduction studies performed using automated devices (for example devices such as NC-stat® System) cannot support testing of other locations and other nerves as needed depending on the concurrent results of testing.

When the beneficiary has a high pre-test or a prior probability for having the diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, the NC-stat® System (alone) will be allowed, one service per arm, using CPT code 95905. The diagnosis codes G56.01, G56.02 or G56.03 should be used. All other diagnosis codes will be denied as not medically necessary.

Nerve conduction studies performed independent of needle electromyography (EMG) may only provide a portion of the information needed to diagnose muscle, nerve root, and most nerve disorders. When the nerve conduction study (NCS) is used on its' own without integrating needle EMG findings or when an individual relies solely on a review of NCS data, the results can be misleading, and important diagnoses may be missed.

In most instances, both NCS and usually EMG are necessary to perform diagnostic testing. While a provider may choose to perform just an NCS, when performed alone it is usually considered not medically necessary. The only exception to this is a situation when a provider may consider it appropriate to perform an NCS without doing an EMG for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome with a high pre-test probability.

B. Electromyography

Neurogenic disorders can be distinguishable from myopathic disorders by a carefully performed EMG. For example, both polymyositis and ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) produce manifest weakness. The former carries a very different prognosis and treatment than the latter. An EMG is very valuable in making this distinction. Similarly, classification of nerve trauma into axonal vs. demyelinating categories, with corresponding differences in prognoses, are possible with EMG. Below is a list of common disorders where an EMG, in tandem with properly conducted NCS, will be helpful in diagnosis:
Nerve compression syndromes, including carpal tunnel syndrome and other focal compressions.

Radiculopathy - cervical, lumbosacral.

Mono/polyneuropathy - metabolic, degenerative, hereditary.

Myopathy - including poly-and dermatomyositis, myotonic and congenital myopathies.

Plexopathy - idiopathic, trauma, infiltration.

Neuromuscular junction disorders - myasthenia gravis. Single fiber EMG is of special value here.

At times, immediately prior to botulinum toxin injection, for localization.

At times, immediately prior to injection of phenol or other substances for nerve blocking or chemodenervation.

There may be other instances, not detailed here, where EMG may be of use.

Use of EMG with Botulinum Toxin Injection

EMG may be used to optimize the anatomic location of botulinum toxin injection. It is expected there will be one study performed per anatomic location of injection, if needed.


Neurogenic disorders can be distinguishable from myopathic disorders by a carefully performed EMG. For example, both polymyositis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) produce manifest weakness. The former carries a very different prognosis and treatment than the latter. An EMG is very valuable in making this distinction. Below is a list of common disorders where an EMG, in tandem with properly conducted NCS, can be helpful in diagnosis:

Nerve compression syndromes, including carpal tunnel syndrome and other focal compressions.

Radiculopathy - cervical, lumbosacral.

Mono/polyneuropathy - metabolic, degenerative, hereditary.

Myopathy - including poly-and dermatomyositis, myotonic and congenital myopathies.

Plexopathy - idiopathic, trauma, infiltration.

Neuromuscular junction disorders - myasthenia gravis. Single fiber EMG is of special value here.

Immediately prior to Botulinum toxin injection, for localization.

Immediately prior to injection of phenol or other substances for nerve blocking or chemodenervation.



Limitations:

Nerve Conduction Studies

Each descriptor (code) from codes 95907, 95908, 95909, 95910, 95911, 95912, and 95913, can be reimbursed only once per nerve, or named branch of a nerve, regardless of the number of sites tested or the number of methods used on that nerve. For instance, testing the ulnar nerve at wrist, forearm, below elbow, above elbow, axilla and supraclavicular regions will all be considered as a single nerve. Motor and sensory nerve testing are considered separate tests. CPT code 95905 is payable only once per limb studied and cannot be used in conjunction with any other nerve conduction codes.

Routine testing for polyneuropathy of diabetes or endstage renal disease (ESRD) is not considered medically necessary and is not covered. Testing for the sole purpose of monitoring disease intensity or treatment efficacy in these two conditions is also not covered.

Psychophysical measurements (current, vibration, thermal perceptions), even though they may involve delivery of a stimulus, are considered to be part of the physical exam and may not be billed as a separate service.

Current Perception Threshold/Sensory Nerve Conduction Threshold Test (sNCT) – is not covered by Medicare. This procedure is different and distinct from assessment of nerve conduction velocity, amplitude and latency. It is also different from short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials. Codes designated for eliciting nerve conduction velocity, latency or amplitude, and those designed for short latency evoked potentials are not to be used for sNCT. The sNCT has a unique code G0255: Effective October 1, 2002, CMS initially concluded that there was insufficient scientific or clinical evidence to consider the sNCT test and the device used in performing this test reasonable and necessary within the meaning of section 1862(a)(1)(A) of the law. Therefore, sNCT was noncovered. Based on a reconsideration [in March, 2004] of current Medicare policy for sNCT, CMS concludes that there continues to be insufficient scientific or clinical evidence to consider the sNCT test and the device used in performing this test as reasonable and necessary within the meaning of section 1862(a)(1)(A) of the law. CMS Publication 100-3, Medicare National Coverage Determinations Manual, Chapter 1, Section 160.23

Examination using portable hand-held devices, or devices which are incapable of real-time wave-form display and analysis, and incapable of both NCS and EMG testing; will be included in the E/M service. They will not be paid separately. Examples include; The Axon II or delta fiber analysis testing and/or machines with other names.

Nerve conduction studies must provide a number of response parameters in a real-time fashion to facilitate provider interpretation. Those parameters include amplitude, latency, configuration and conduction velocity. Medicare does not accept diagnostic studies that do not provide this information or those that provide delayed interpretation as substitutes for Nerve conduction studies. Raw measurement data obtained and transmitted trans-telephonically or over the Internet, therefore, does not qualify for the payment of the electrodiagnostic service codes included in this LCD.

Medicare does not expect to receive claims for nerve conduction testing accomplished with discriminatory devices that use fixed anatomic templates and computer-generated reports used as an adjunct to physical examination routinely on all patients.

NCS can help in localization of an abnormality, and in distinguishing one variety of neuropathy from another: for example, diffuse vs. multifocal; axonal vs. demyelinating. Such distinction has diagnostic value. Specific classification of nerve injuries into neuropraxia and axonotmesis can be made on the basis of conduction studies and electromyography. Such classification has a bearing on prognosis and treatment.

Focal neuropathies or compressive lesions such as carpal tunnel syndrome or ulnar neuropathies, for localization.

Diagnosis and prognosis of traumatic nerve lesions.

Diagnosis or confirmation of suspected generalized neuropathies, such as diabetic, uremic, metabolic or immune.

Repetitive nerve stimulation in diagnosis of neuromuscular junction disorders such as myasthenia gravis, myasthenic syndrome.

Pain, paresthesia, or weakness in an extremity can be a reason for a NCS or EMG.

Immediately prior to Botulinum toxin injection, for localization.

Immediately prior to injection of phenol or other substances for nerve blocking or chemodenervation.

Nerve conduction studies performed using automated devices (for example devices such as NC-stat ® System) are not separately payable and are usually considered part of the associated evaluation and management service.

Electromyography

It is expected that providers will use CPT code 95870 for sampling muscles other than the paraspinals associated with the extremities, which have been tested. Medicare would not expect to see this code billed when the paraspinal muscles corresponding to an extremity are tested and when the extremity EMG code 95860, 95861, 95863 or 95864 is also billed. The necessity and reasonableness of the following uses of EMG studies have not been established:
exclusive testing of intrinsic foot muscles in the diagnosis of proximal lesions

definitive diagnostic conclusions based on paraspinal EMG in regions bearing scar of past surgeries (e.g., previous laminectomies)

pattern-setting limited limb muscle examinations, without paraspinal muscle testing for a diagnosis of radiculopathy

EMG testing shortly after trauma, before EMG abnormalities would have reasonably had time to develop

surface and macro EMG’s

multiple uses of EMG in the same patient at the same location of the same limb for the purpose of optimizing botulinum toxin injections.

For outpatient settings other than Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF)s, references to "physicians" throughout this policy include non-physicians, such as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and physician assistants. Such non-physician practitioners, with certain exceptions, may certify, order and establish the plan of care as authorized by State law. (See Sections 1861[s][2] and 1862[a][14] of Title XVIII of the Social Security Act; 42 CFR, Sections 410.74, 410.75, 410.76 and 419.22; 58 FR 18543, April 7, 2000.) Each practitioner must provide only those services within the scope of practice for each state.

The necessity and reasonableness of the following uses of EMG have not been established:

Exclusive testing of intrinsic foot muscles in the diagnosis of proximal lesions.

Diagnostic conclusions based on paraspinal EMG in regions bearing scar of past surgeries (e.g., previous laminectomies).

Pattern-setting limited limb muscle examinations, without paraspinal muscle testing for a diagnosis of radiculopathy.

Immediately after trauma, before EMG abnormalities would have had time to develop.

Surface and macro EMG.

Multiple EMG services in the same patient at the same location of the same limb for the purpose of optimizing botulinum toxin injections.

NOTE: Both NCS and EMG are necessary to perform diagnostic testing and therefore must be billed together. The only exception to this is when a physician may consider it appropriate to perform an NCS without doing an EMG for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.


Covered ICD-10 CODE DESCRIPTION

A05.1 Botulism food poisoning
A35 Other tetanus
A52.15 Late syphilitic neuropathy
B91 Sequelae of poliomyelitis
E08.40 - E08.49 - Opens in a new window Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified - Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other diabetic neurological complication
E08.610 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy
E09.40 - E09.49 - Opens in a new window Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified - Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications with other diabetic neurological complication
E09.610 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy
E10.40 - E10.49 - Opens in a new window Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified - Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic neurological complication
E10.610 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy
E11.40 - E11.49 - Opens in a new window Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic neurological complication
E11.610 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy
E13.40 - E13.49 - Opens in a new window Other specified diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified - Other specified diabetes mellitus with other diabetic neurological complication
E13.610 Other specified diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy
E51.2 - E51.9 - Opens in a new window Wernicke's encephalopathy - Thiamine deficiency, unspecified
G04.1 Tropical spastic paraplegia
G11.0 - G13.1 - Opens in a new window Congenital nonprogressive ataxia - Other systemic atrophy primarily affecting central nervous system in neoplastic disease
G14 - G20 - Opens in a new window Postpolio syndrome - Parkinson's disease
G21.4 Vascular parkinsonism
G24.01 - G24.9 - Opens in a new window Drug induced subacute dyskinesia - Dystonia, unspecified
G25.3 Myoclonus
G25.61 - G25.69 - Opens in a new window Drug induced tics - Other tics of organic origin
G25.89 - G25.9 - Opens in a new window Other specified extrapyramidal and movement disorders - Extrapyramidal and movement disorder, unspecified
G32.0 - G32.81 - Opens in a new window Subacute combined degeneration of spinal cord in diseases classified elsewhere - Cerebellar ataxia in diseases classified elsewhere
G35 - G37.9 - Opens in a new window Multiple sclerosis - Demyelinating disease of central nervous system, unspecified
G50.0 - G50.9 - Opens in a new window Trigeminal neuralgia - Disorder of trigeminal nerve, unspecified
G51.2 - G51.9 - Opens in a new window Melkersson's syndrome - Disorder of facial nerve, unspecified
G52.1 - G61.89 - Opens in a new window Disorders of glossopharyngeal nerve - Other inflammatory polyneuropathies
G62.0 - G62.89 - Opens in a new window Drug-induced polyneuropathy - Other specified polyneuropathies
G63 - G83.9 - Opens in a new window Polyneuropathy in diseases classified elsewhere - Paralytic syndrome, unspecified
G90.01 - G90.09 - Opens in a new window Carotid sinus syncope - Other idiopathic peripheral autonomic neuropathy
G90.2 Horner's syndrome
G90.4 - G90.9 - Opens in a new window Autonomic dysreflexia - Disorder of the autonomic nervous system, unspecified
G95.0 - G95.19 - Opens in a new window Syringomyelia and syringobulbia - Other vascular myelopathies
G95.81 - G95.89 - Opens in a new window Conus medullaris syndrome - Other specified diseases of spinal cord
G99.0 - G99.2 - Opens in a new window Autonomic neuropathy in diseases classified elsewhere - Myelopathy in diseases classified elsewhere
H02.141 - H02.149 - Opens in a new window Spastic ectropion of right upper eyelid - Spastic ectropion of unspecified eye, unspecified eyelid
H49.00 - H49.43 - Opens in a new window Third [oculomotor] nerve palsy, unspecified eye - Progressive external ophthalmoplegia, bilateral
H49.881 - H51.9 - Opens in a new window Other paralytic strabismus, right eye - Unspecified disorder of binocular movement
I95.1 Orthostatic hypotension
J38.00 - J38.02 - Opens in a new window Paralysis of vocal cords and larynx, unspecified - Paralysis of vocal cords and larynx, bilateral
J38.5 Laryngeal spasm
J38.7 Other diseases of larynx
K22.0 Achalasia of cardia
M05.40 - M05.59 - Opens in a new window Rheumatoid myopathy with rheumatoid arthritis of unspecified site - Rheumatoid polyneuropathy with rheumatoid arthritis of multiple sites
M21.071 - M21.079 - Opens in a new window Valgus deformity, not elsewhere classified, right ankle - Valgus deformity, not elsewhere classified, unspecified ankle
M21.171 - M21.179 - Opens in a new window Varus deformity, not elsewhere classified, right ankle - Varus deformity, not elsewhere classified, unspecified ankle
M21.331 - M21.379 - Opens in a new window Wrist drop, right wrist - Foot drop, unspecified foot
M21.511 - M21.519 - Opens in a new window Acquired clawhand, right hand - Acquired clawhand, unspecified hand
M21.531 - M21.6X9 - Opens in a new window Acquired clawfoot, right foot - Other acquired deformities of unspecified foot
M33.00 - M33.99 - Opens in a new window Juvenile dermatopolymyositis, organ involvement unspecified - Dermatopolymyositis, unspecified with other organ involvement
M34.82 - M34.83 - Opens in a new window Systemic sclerosis with myopathy - Systemic sclerosis with polyneuropathy
M35.03 Sicca syndrome with myopathy
M35.3 Polymyalgia rheumatica
M35.8 Other specified systemic involvement of connective tissue
M36.0 Dermato(poly)myositis in neoplastic disease
M43.00 - M43.19 - Opens in a new window Spondylolysis, site unspecified - Spondylolisthesis, multiple sites in spine
M43.6 Torticollis
M46.41 - M46.47 - Opens in a new window Discitis, unspecified, occipito-atlanto-axial region - Discitis, unspecified, lumbosacral region
M47.011 - M47.16 - Opens in a new window Anterior spinal artery compression syndromes, occipito-atlanto-axial region - Other spondylosis with myelopathy, lumbar region
M48.00 Spinal stenosis, site unspecified
M48.04 - M48.08 - Opens in a new window Spinal stenosis, thoracic region - Spinal stenosis, sacral and sacrococcygeal region
M50.00 - M50.13 - Opens in a new window Cervical disc disorder with myelopathy, unspecified cervical region - Cervical disc disorder with radiculopathy, cervicothoracic region
M50.80 - M51.17 - Opens in a new window Other cervical disc disorders, unspecified cervical region - Intervertebral disc disorders with radiculopathy, lumbosacral region
M51.84 - M51.9 - Opens in a new window Other intervertebral disc disorders, thoracic region - Unspecified thoracic, thoracolumbar and lumbosacral intervertebral disc disorder
M54.10 - M54.42 - Opens in a new window Radiculopathy, site unspecified - Lumbago with sciatica, left side
M60.000 - M60.09 - Opens in a new window Infective myositis, unspecified right arm - Infective myositis, multiple sites
M60.80 - M60.9 - Opens in a new window Other myositis, unspecified site - Myositis, unspecified
M62.50 - M62.82 - Opens in a new window Muscle wasting and atrophy, not elsewhere classified, unspecified site - Rhabdomyolysis
M79.1 - M79.2 - Opens in a new window Myalgia - Neuralgia and neuritis, unspecified
M79.601 - M79.7 - Opens in a new window Pain in right arm - Fibromyalgia
M96.1 Postlaminectomy syndrome, not elsewhere classified
M99.22 - M99.29 - Opens in a new window Subluxation stenosis of neural canal of thoracic region - Subluxation stenosis of neural canal of abdomen and other regions
M99.32 - M99.39 - Opens in a new window Osseous stenosis of neural canal of thoracic region - Osseous stenosis of neural canal of abdomen and other regions
M99.42 - M99.49 - Opens in a new window Connective tissue stenosis of neural canal of thoracic region - Connective tissue stenosis of neural canal of abdomen and other regions
M99.52 - M99.59 - Opens in a new window Intervertebral disc stenosis of neural canal of thoracic region - Intervertebral disc stenosis of neural canal of abdomen and other regions
M99.62 - M99.69 - Opens in a new window Osseous and subluxation stenosis of intervertebral foramina of thoracic region - Osseous and subluxation stenosis of intervertebral foramina of abdomen and other regions
M99.72 - M99.79 - Opens in a new window Connective tissue and disc stenosis of intervertebral foramina of thoracic region - Connective tissue and disc stenosis of intervertebral foramina of abdomen and other regions
N39.3 - N39.498 - Opens in a new window Stress incontinence (female) (male) - Other specified urinary incontinence
Q06.2 Diastematomyelia
Q68.0 Congenital deformity of sternocleidomastoid muscle
R15.0 Incomplete defecation
R15.2 - R15.9 - Opens in a new window Fecal urgency - Full incontinence of feces
R20.0 - R20.9 - Opens in a new window Anesthesia of skin - Unspecified disturbances of skin sensation
R25.0 - R26.1 - Opens in a new window Abnormal head movements - Paralytic gait
R26.81 - R29.0 - Opens in a new window Unsteadiness on feet - Tetany
R29.5 Transient paralysis
R32 Unspecified urinary incontinence
R39.14 Feeling of incomplete bladder emptying
R47.1 Dysarthria and anarthria
R49.0 - R49.9 - Opens in a new window Dysphonia - Unspecified voice and resonance disorder
R94.131 Abnormal electromyogram [EMG]
S04.50XA - S04.52XS - Opens in a new window Injury of facial nerve, unspecified side, initial encounter - Injury of facial nerve, left side, sequela
S04.811A - S04.899S - Opens in a new window Injury of olfactory [1st ] nerve, right side, initial encounter - Injury of other cranial nerves, unspecified side, sequela
S14.0XXA - S14.108S - Opens in a new window Concussion and edema of cervical spinal cord, initial encounter - Unspecified injury at C8 level of cervical spinal cord, sequela
S14.111A - S14.118S - Opens in a new window Complete lesion at C1 level of cervical spinal cord, initial encounter - Complete lesion at C8 level of cervical spinal cord, sequela
S14.121A - S14.128S - Opens in a new window Central cord syndrome at C1 level of cervical spinal cord, initial encounter - Central cord syndrome at C8 level of cervical spinal cord, sequela
S14.131A - S14.138S - Opens in a new window Anterior cord syndrome at C1 level of cervical spinal cord, initial encounter - Anterior cord syndrome at C8 level of cervical spinal cord, sequela
S14.141A - S14.148S - Opens in a new window Brown-Sequard syndrome at C1 level of cervical spinal cord, initial encounter - Brown-Sequard syndrome at C8 level of cervical spinal cord, sequela
S14.151A - S14.158S - Opens in a new window Other incomplete lesion at C1 level of cervical spinal cord, initial encounter - Other incomplete lesion at C8 level of cervical spinal cord, sequela

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